This week we have another example for you from our fascinating collection of swindling emails. This piece of crookery sounds like it’s been fed through Google translate and come out a bit chewed up.

Dear Client,

The hotel Arriva Hotel informed us that the data of given credit card was not accepted
(the reservation number GDJN66026169) .

It could happen because of several reasons:
• Expiration date – end – does the expiration date of the card finish until the date arrival registration?
• The reasonable balance – did the card have enough money on the card for reservation?
• The type of the card – does the hotel accept such a type of the card?
You shouldnt worry about it. Your hotel reservation is actually.

However in order to guarantee its keeping, you have to refresh the credit card date during 36 hours after this message receiving.

Print the reservation, fill it in and fax to the hotel address.

Print Booking Details

I don’t think so.

What gives it away? There are mistakes, but there’s also the scammers’ classic inconsistent use of brand language.

We have the relaxed, friendly and incorrectly punctuated: ‘You shouldnt worry about it.’ Followed by the technically correct but antediluvian language: ‘in order to guarantee its keeping’.

My favourite sentence is “Your hotel reservation is actually.’ And then there’s the phrase ‘reasonable balance’.

Look closely at the language here and its attempt to rob you of your credit card details and your ‘reasonable balance’.

One more good reason to make sure your own organisation’s copywriters and customer services chaps and chappesses stick closely to your brand’s tone of voice.